Women: Depression and heart failure?



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Women: Depression and heart failure? According to a new study by the Ruhr-Universität Bochum, which was presented on Saturday at the DKG's cardiology congress in Mannheim, depression and anxiety are more common in women who suffer from heart failure.

According to a new study by the Ruhr-Universität Bochum, which was presented on Saturday at the DKG's cardiology congress in Mannheim, depression and anxiety are more common in women who suffer from heart failure. At the 76th annual conference of the German Society for Cardiology - Heart and Circulatory Research (DGK), which took place from April 8 to 10 in Mannheim, Dr. Claudia Pieper from the Ruhr University Bochum carried out an examination on heart failure patients. Of the 150 heart failure patients examined, around a third were female. During the specialist examinations and standardized questionnaires in the context of the study, it was noticed that the female patients complained more often of anxiety and depression and cardiac arrhythmias than the men. Over half of the women reported fear, compared to almost 42 percent of the half of the male patients. When it comes to the extent of depression, patients were more or less the same with around 30 percent.

It was also interesting that three months after discharge, the depression of the female patients rose to about 46 percent. In the case of male patients, however, the value fell by around 22 percent. At the same conference, Dr. Robert Nechwatal from the Christiaan Barnard Clinic (RHM nursing home and clinic group) in Schmannewitz that 21.1 percent of patients with cardiac insufficiency were asked about depression. Together with colleagues at the clinic in Schmannewitz, he had examined patients with cardiac insufficiency using standardized questionnaires. In addition, the doctors examined the social environment for support for those affected. As a result, Dr. Nechwatal at the DKG annual conference that a deficit situation in social support can support depression. Conversely, “social and emotional integration” seems to offer a suitable preventive protective factor against depression.

Dr. Pieper also advises that in future, especially female patients with heart failure should be better monitored in order to be able to take appropriate measures against anxiety and depression as early as possible. (Thorsten Fischer, naturopath osteopathy, April 11, 2010)

Also read:
Depression (depressive syndrome)
New therapeutic approach in the treatment of depression
Suicide in depressed people
Does the disease sex addiction exist?

Author and source information



Video: Depression and Womens Heart Disease


Previous Article

Atrial fibrillation: Get your heart back in time

Next Article

Vaccination against shingles for patients over 50